knives, forks and spoons

photo by hue-12

The US uses about 40-100 billion plastic utensils a year. Instead of one-use, disposable cutlery, use your own utensils, whether at home or at work. Ditch the plastic forks with your take out as well. Yes, you will have to wash a fork or spoon, but it’s a lot less resource intensive than making and tossing a plastic one. It saves $$ for restaurants too, so share the love!

Corona Fit Packs: Smart stackable can solution does away with six-pack rings — Life & Soul Magazine

Mexican beer brand Corona has created a screwable, stackable can in an innovative approach to tackle the problem and impact of plastic waste on the environment. The new Fit Packs involve screwable, stackable cans with screw threads at the top and bottom of each can, allowing up to ten cans to be stacked on top of […]

Corona Fit Packs: Smart stackable can solution does away with six-pack rings — Life & Soul Magazine

vampire loads

photo by clint patterson

Even when they’re off, energy vampires like computers, DVRs, cable boxes, chargers and even coffee makers slowly drain electricity. Vampire loads use about 5% of the energy consumed in the US, costing electric customers more than $3 billion each year. Tonight turn off your lights and look for standby lights. They’re a sign that something is draining power, even though it isn’t being used. Unplug them when they’re not in use, or use power strip to make powering on and off easier.

paper or plastic?

photo by david veksler

Take your pick, or preferably, bring your own bag. But some studies show that what you put in your shopping bag and how you travel is much more important. To make a bigger  difference, eat less meat, walk/combine trips, fly less and buy locally-made products. Bottom line: reuse whatever bags you have at home- until they fall apart. 

Colgate’s new recyclable toothpaste tube is nearly ready. It took 5 years to develop — WGNO

Toothpaste tubes currently on the market are impossible to recycle because the mix of plastics and aluminum contained in them. Soon, you may be able to toss your used-up toothpaste tube in the blue bin. Colgate said it has finalized a design for a “first-of-its kind recyclable toothpaste tube.” The change is part of the company’s efforts to have all of its products use recyclable packaging by 2025.

Colgate’s new recyclable toothpaste tube is nearly ready. It took 5 years to develop — WGNO